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A gorgeous guy has just saved my life and it turns out he's half angel. Demons are hunting me. Oh, and things will only get worse on my 18th birthday? A second chance to prove that love never fails. A clean wholesome romance series that's touching and tender. Grab this awesome box set now! Christian culture has been infected by an antichrist spirit, hindering us from doing what Jesus did.


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Expose every lie working against the anointing. Review "Anthony Bartlett offers a groundbreaking thesis on how and why Christ saves us from sin and death. Related Video Shorts 0 Upload your video. Share your thoughts with other customers. Write a customer review.

Beyond Forgiveness: Reflections on Atonement

There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later. This book had a huge impact on me when I first read it over a decade ago, and I have reread it since. For two millennia, Christians have been asking why Jesus died, and offering various interpretations of the meaning of that death.

It was, however, a theology that gained ascendency within the Church as Christianity became more and more integrated into the militarism of feudal Europe. An empire conceived in and sustained by violence had to have a violent God. And it remains the most popular atonement theory in the Christian world today. Bartlett shows how this theology is grounded in violence, and offers an alternative way to understand the death of Christ that is crucial for a contemporary world threatened with nuclear annihilation.

It is the heart of darkness, a state of abandonment in which there is nothing to grab onto.

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In purely human terms, it really is the end of the road. Such a moment for Jesus was the crucifixion. And yet, as Bartlett argues, was precisely from within that place that unlimited compassion, and the hope that attends it, suddenly and unexpectedly broke forth, beginning a radical transformation of humanity. This hope, this transformation, was not something that broke in from outside the abyss of despair; on the contrary, the miracle is that boundless compassion and hope arose from within it, without discernable cause or precedent. It makes no sense. And yet, it happens. In the case of Kennedy, it is the unspeakable truth about what was behind the violence that slaughtered the president.


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  • And because it has become a cultural unspeakable, the truth is buried, violence rules, and hope dies. The irony, however, is that precisely because the darkness is so great, just one voice witnessing to the truth can light up the sky like a firework display.

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    It is where real hope begins. From now on, after the death of Christ, the abyss becomes the place of potential hope and change. Earlier in the book, he performs a similar work on Augustine, the original framer of Christian violence. It is an exhilarating experience to discover that ideas that have passed as the touchstones of orthodoxy are, in fact, the accretions of culture. This is a brilliant book that requires immersion, not selective appropriation.

    It is hard to do justice to the quality of the writing in a short review. The central claim that Christianity became violent by allowing its central narrative to be molded around secular violence is an important and compelling one. Cross Purposes is an important book in the continuing conversation about the saving significance of Jesus' death. Surveying historical thinking on atonement, the book unearths the traces of sacralized violence in atonement thinking. In lateth-century Russian high society, St.

    Petersburg aristocrat Anna Karenina enters into a life-changing affair with the dashing Count Alexei Vronsky. An Irish immigrant lands in s Brooklyn, where she quickly falls into a romance with a local. When her past catches up with her, however, she must choose between two countries and the lives that exist within. A chronicle of the life of 18th century aristocrat Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire, who was reviled for her extravagant political and personal life.

    A mousy governess who softens the heart of her employer soon discovers that he's hiding a terrible secret. Follows the lives of eight very different couples in dealing with their love lives in various loosely interrelated tales all set during a frantic month before Christmas in London, England. A look at how the intense relationship between Carl Jung and Sigmund Freud gives birth to psychoanalysis. A poor yet passionate young man falls in love with a rich young woman, giving her a sense of freedom, but they are soon separated because of their social differences.

    Dashwood dies, leaving his second wife and her three daughters poor by the rules of inheritance. The two eldest daughters are the titular opposites. A sixteen-year-old girl who was raised by her father to be the perfect assassin is dispatched on a mission across Europe, tracked by a ruthless intelligence agent and her operatives. When Briony Tallis, 13 years old and an aspiring writer, sees her older sister Cecilia and Robbie Turner at the fountain in front of the family estate she misinterprets what is happening thus setting into motion a series of misunderstandings and a childish pique that will have lasting repercussions for all of them.

    Robbie is the son of a family servant toward whom the family has always been kind. They paid for his time at Cambridge and now he plans on going to medical school. After the fountain incident, Briony reads a letter intended for Cecilia and concludes that Robbie is a deviant. When her cousin Lola is raped, she tells the police that it was Robbie she saw committing the deed. My brain tends to turn to mush in the presence of greatness. This makes it difficult when I want to write about something that I thought was truly great.

    It is so much easier to write about something that is rubbish. I thought that "Atonement" was terrific. It is a really great movie. Obviously it is early days yet, and there are a lot of contenders still to appear, but "Atonement" might just be the winner-in-waiting of the Best Film Oscar in Put your money on it now. From the hazy, dreamy, hopeful days of , a destructive act of spite, the horrors of Dunkirk with one of the most fantastic long takes I have seen in a cinema for a very long , to the aftermath and a devastating "happy" ending, it is a magnificent and moving film, beautifully directed by Joe Wright.

    So helpful, in fact, that is overcomes all of the nuances that I disagree with to get a fourth star. First of all, the book's leading metaphor is worth the price of the book alone. Having said that, this is NOT a book on the different theories of atonement. This is a book on the larger ideas that drive atonement. Towards the end of the book, McKnights summary treatment of the New Perspective on Paul as it relates to atonement was one of the best I've read. He ends the book by pointing out something that needs to be written on by more people.

    He says that atonement is also a work that the community of God engages in and he speaks to the praxis of atonement. While I didn't enjoy every chapter in that section I particularly thought the chapter on the Word of God was problematic and created too many false dichotomies , it was very useful. Overall, I would say that no in-depth study on atonement would be complete without reading maybe starting with this book. Jan 20, Bryan rated it it was amazing.

    An excellent treatment of how to deal with the various historical atonement theories use all of them. I thought that the "communal" aspects of atonement dealt with in the final part of the book was the best and most valuable part and also most demonstrated why all the historical theories are together needed in the reconciling work of God for humankind.

    The book is short but I felt was every bit as valuable as some longer "atonement" books I read recently by N. Wright and Peter Leithart, so An excellent treatment of how to deal with the various historical atonement theories use all of them. Wright and Peter Leithart, so don't let its brevity make you think it is lacking in substance. Jan 03, Heather Harding rated it it was amazing. I read this book at the recommendation of Frank Viola, co-author of Jesus Manifesto: Restoring the Supremacy and Sovereignty of Jesus Christ and found it to live up to the recommendation.

    Scot McKnight is commonly associated with the emergent church movement and this book is indeed the opening volume of a series from that community. The material itself, however, stands well on its own and it provides a very strong and very practical look at the atonement that will serve anyone, from any tradition I read this book at the recommendation of Frank Viola, co-author of Jesus Manifesto: The material itself, however, stands well on its own and it provides a very strong and very practical look at the atonement that will serve anyone, from any tradition or background, to see the panorama of the atonement and how it is understood throughout all of Christian History and across many Christian communities.

    Lest anyone imagine that this is just a book of theology and history that operates in the intellectual realm McKnight keeps things very much rooted in the practical and speaks of how these truths tie into daily expression and community as a whole. The primary theme of the book finds its expression in human beings as "cracked eikons" or the marred image of God within us. The atonement as the restoration of mankind is a constant theme as well with the multiple metaphors of scripture looked at with a caution against adopting any one of the them as the "master theme" to the diminishing or exclusion of the others.

    PSA tends to be at the core of most reformed, evangelical and fundamentalist theology and practice and it has been a particular target of many who see it as offensive and exclusionary. Instead of dismissing it out of hand or accepting it as it is popularly applied, McKnight takes a conciliatory tact viewing it in balance with several other metaphors within the Bible and reminding the reader that the metaphor is not the things itself.


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    This combined with a similar handling and familiarizing of the reader with the different themes and metaphors allows for a very rich appreciation of the atonement and it's beauty. Add to this that McKnight brings in as well an element often skimmed over in other venues, that being the title theme of the community and it's tie-in through Pentecost. All in all, Frank didn't steer me wrong. This is a beautiful, educational, practical and inspiring thematic work that anyone, coming from any Christian tradition should come away from with a deeper appreciation of their own tradition as well as expand their understanding of others and perhaps even temper their understanding to see how pervasive the atonement is in all areas of life, fellowship and community.

    Aug 26, David Campton rated it it was ok Shelves: This started so well The editor's preface had claimed that the series to which this book belongs offered "approachable theology" suitable for church small groups Scot's own prologue offered a helpful analogy of why we need multiple metaphors for the atonement, and the title suggested that the language with which we express our theology particularly our theology of the atonement significantly shapes our relationships within the church and with the wider world However, it all fell apart This started so well However, it all fell apart pretty fast The further I got into it the less it seemed to be accessible to those without the "benefit" of a university-based theological education.

    At the same time, I felt that Scot was simplifying things in unhelpful ways, e. But I thought that all this would pay off as he explored, for me, the key issue of how our theology of atonement does or should shape our Christian community and its relationship with the wider community. But the pay-of never came Indeed the last section, exploring atonement in terms of "Missional Praxis" was very thin And these got thinner and thinner as the end approached It was almost as if the editor had been breathing down his neck, and he had finished it in a hurry. The editor's preface promised that this series would not offer a page monograph There were glimmers of what might have been As such I hope that he returns to this subject, freed from the artificial constraints of this "Living Theology" series, to explore it more fully, especially in terms of its implications for the shaping of Christian community Jul 15, Tim rated it really liked it.

    McKnight does a great job of moving the focus away from atonement theories and toward the much more important atonement metaphors we find in Scripture ie redemption, ransom, reconciliation, substitution, justification, offering. His contention is that we tend to grab on to a favored biblical metaphor and neglect the others, when in reality we need all the metaphors Scripture gives us if we are going to have a full picture of what the work of Christ has accomplished for us.

    Sin is a Great book! Sin is a multifaceted problem with a host of results, and God chose a number of pictures to help us understand the fullness of Christ's work in overcoming sin. I appreciated McKnight's example of different atonement theories being like golf clubs - you can play a round of golf with just your 5-iron, but there is a reason you have more than one club in your bag. I also appreciated his overarching summary for the different metaphors in his words, the golf bag the clubs go into that atonement is about "identification for incorporation.

    Finally, I was glad to see the strong affirmation that McKnight gives for penal substitution. Too many, it seems, in their eagerness to see the church embrace a broad biblical view of the atonement, are willing to throw substitution under the bus. McKnight affirms penal substitution as biblical and crucial, while encouraging us to make sure that is not the only club in our bag.

    Nov 14, Jeremy rated it really liked it Shelves: This book took me off guard because the Intro or maybe Forward talked about this being a book in a series of accessible, non-theologically heavy, small group usable books. While not Calvin's Institutes, this was most certainly a theological work, full of terminology like perichoresis, eikon, praxis, etc.

    After adjusting my expectations, I thoroughly enjoyed this work.

    Beyond Forgiveness: Reflections on Atonement by Phil Cousineau

    McKnight challenges the reader to broaden their concept of atonement, not by watering it down, but by seeing it in its' full co This book took me off guard because the Intro or maybe Forward talked about this being a book in a series of accessible, non-theologically heavy, small group usable books. McKnight challenges the reader to broaden their concept of atonement, not by watering it down, but by seeing it in its' full context.

    He is arguing for not just adopting one theory or analogy of atonement but rather synthesize them into a cohesive view of what atonement means, what atonement does, and what atonement calls us to. My only complaints are that at times it felt like he was massaging passages or topics to fit them into his construct and these were the aspects of his argument that I most disagreed with and that either the author or the editor seemed to have lost steam by the time the book got to the application phase.

    I'd rather have the theological ponderings be more brief and the application be more robust. If you'd like an articulate, thorough, and at least seemingly orthodox take there are times that an entire chapter makes total sense but the way he sums it up sounds off on the main thrust of the New Perspectives on Paul and the Emergent Church, I think this is the place to look. May 28, Kyle rated it it was amazing. In A Community Called Atonement, McKnight suggests that modern discussions about the atonement are too narrowly focused.

    Using the analogy of golf, he suggests that we need a golf bag that can hold the various clubs atonement metaphors so that they can each be used in the appropriate circumstances. The analogy is helpful, as is his defense of his position. Reading the New Testament not to mention OT precursors , I have always found it difficult to fit the view of authors into any one category In A Community Called Atonement, McKnight suggests that modern discussions about the atonement are too narrowly focused.

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    Reading the New Testament not to mention OT precursors , I have always found it difficult to fit the view of authors into any one category. I don't think so. It's hard not to find that in 1 Corinthians McKnight's discussion was persuasive and helped me bring together into a more unified theology certain things I already saw in Scripture but couldn't place well into a coherent view of atonement.

    A Community Called Atonement

    McKnight ultimately argues for a golf bag that he calls identification for incorporation. I conclude with a passage from the book that I think nicely sums up much of what McKnight is saying throughout: Herein is the telic heart of atonement: God provides atonement in order to create a fellowship of persons who love God and love others, who find healing for the self, and who care about the world" May 24, Paul Patterson rated it really liked it.

    This book is an Incredibly comprehensive analysis of Atonement theories which reaches past doctrine into praxis. Scott is informed by an emergent and post-modern friendly approach that doesn't endorse any one of the traditional views of Atonement but seeks to integrate all of them into an incorporative model. His homey example from golfing is helpful. He says that the game of golf is hobbled if one were to use just one club - it takes many clubs to play the various settings your ball may land in This book is an Incredibly comprehensive analysis of Atonement theories which reaches past doctrine into praxis.

    He says that the game of golf is hobbled if one were to use just one club - it takes many clubs to play the various settings your ball may land in. So too with the atonement theories where using the most helpful theory for the human situation is demanded. This leaves the theory open to many problems including a misrepresentation of God as putting his holiness and justice above his love and grace. Scott himself seems to favour the use of the recapitulation theory or the incorporative participative model as particularly significant for our era - it is akin to a bad in which to hold the other theories.

    In his closing chapters emphasis is stressed on the atonement as a community practice including justice, mission, scripture reading and sacraments.